• Tips for Future Fibers Entrepreneurs

    No comments yet

    Get involved LOCALLY – build relationships with people even if it’s a restaurant owner. He might not be you customer, but he can get you one.”

    By Anu Agarwal and Eva Dunn

    In our exploration of the Savannah fibers scene, our team has been out and about, learning from those already contributing. Below is an interview with Adrienne Cronberger, owner at STITCH by team members Anu and Eva . But before the interview here is a short history of the Savannah company:

    Originally from Buffalo, New York, Adrienne moved to Savannah in 2003 to attend SCAD to study Performing Arts and Costume Design. After graduating, she began working at Stitch under the ownership of Eileen Roy. When Eileen retired in 2012, she turned over the business to Adrienne who continues to grow it. Mary Evelyn received her bachelors degree in Fashion Design from the SCAD in 2012 and began working at Stitch shortly after. She specializes in draping and pattern making and is the main consultant for custom work at Stitch.

    Anu & Eva (A+E): Why Savannah?

    Adrienne: I love this city. It is a small city with qualities of a big city. Everyone knows everyone here.

    A&E: Is there a local fiber’s community? In what ways do the fibers community stay connected?

    Adrienne: There used to be blog parties online. It was good for getting involved and networking.

    A&E: What’s your primary customer base? Savannah locals or visitors?

    Adrienne: Ninety percent of my customers are from Savannah. Most of them are returning ones. Since so many weddings happen in Savannah in the beautiful parks we have, I also have customers who are visiting this city.

     A&E: Is there anything missing in Savannah in order for the fibers community to grow?

    Adrienne: The fibers community in Savannah is growing but the extra push, I feel, is missing. Everyone knows each other, and we’re all are connected, so we don’t have community meetings anymore. There should be: “Let’s all sit down, let’s all do promotion. Bring people out, kind of a Open House, I say.”

     A&E: How was your experience at starting your own business?

    Adrienne: Since Stitch existed and I took over, I didn’t have as much a struggle as others would if they started their own company, to settle loans and earn a profit. See, if one were to take loans and rent a place, it takes a minimum 5 years to settle everything and actually start earning a profit. You have to keep that in mind and be prepared for this.

     A&E: What do you do with any extra materials that you can’t use?

    Adrienne: I used to advertise about the fabric patches that would be of no use to me. I wanted students to come and take away the material from hand, because I was literally going to throw it away.

     A&E: : What are the immediate steps that come to your mind about establishing a small business in Savannah?

    Adrienne: 1) Think about your product 2) How good are you at making it/crafting?   3) Do you have enough money to start a business? How much do you need?  4) Research information about starting a business including finances, loans, & earning profit. This is very important.

    To know more about this awesome girl and their work Stitch’s website. Thank you, Adrienne and  Mary!

  • Understanding the Fabric

    No comments yet

    The last five weeks have been dedicated to learning not only about fibers and textiles, but the dreams, career visions and passions of our colleagues in the Fibers Studio Production class at SCAD. So far we have surveyed the fibers students’ skills, taken a peek at the local economy and analyzed how the two can integrate.

    Read more

  • What if Just One of Them Started a Sustainable Business in Savannah?

    No comments yet

    If you’ve been following this blog, you know a little about what recent Sustainable Practices in Design classes at SCAD have been up to. Intermingling with a group called Accelerate Savannah, these classes have been asking questions about the local economy.

    Read more

  • Experiencing the Batey Rehab Project

    No comments yet

    This Thursday, the CEO and Founder of the Batey Rehab Project, Katie May Godkin, will be making a presentation at the SCAD Museum of Art at 11:30am. Katie is also an alumna of SCAD’s Architecture program. BRP’s mission is to mobilize a movement of people to aid in the deliverance of knowledge, thus creating a shift of thinking towards international projects and programs integrated within Batey communities in the Dominican Republic. And they provide life-changing volunteer trips for students to help support that mission. Design for Sustainability masters student April Lee is one of many SCAD students who have taken advantage of this opportunity in the past.

    Read more

  • What’s Your Sa.Ga?

    No comments yet

    The last post in this series of 4 focuses on the question of openness and outreach for a Savannah-based  hub for economic development that embodies environmental, social and cultural sustainability. A team of 4 students in the previous Sustainable Practices in Design class—Nicole Andrews, Jerome Elder, Liz Lukken and Santiago Castillo—focused on this particular question:

    3: What methods of outreach could be applied to increase awareness, participation, and excitement in the hub’s endeavor?

    Read more

  • What tools and frameworks would be helpful in creating a sustainable business hub?

    No comments yet

    By Scott Boylston

    While the last post shared the design work created by a SCAD Sustainable Practices in Design team focused on the physical attributes and the general operations of a sustainable hub for Accelerate Savannah, this post shares another team’s work, which focused on the second question:

    2: What tools and frameworks could help such a hub effectively accelerate existing collaborations in sustainable sectors of the Savannah economy?

    Read more

  • What would a hub for a sustainable economy look like, and where might it be located?

    No comments yet

    By Scott Boylston

    This is the second of 4 posts that delineate the efforts made by the Sustainable Practices in Design classes at SCAD to help members of Accelerate Savannah shape a green jobs economy in Savannah. With the task of exploring potential locations and operational models of a “sustainable hub,” the class homed in on three questions, the first of which was:

    1: What kind of physical space would best serve the objectives of the hub, and where in Savannah does such a place already exist?

    Read more

  • Next Steps Toward a Green Economy

    2 Comments »

    By Scott Boylston

    For five months over the course of the last year, two SCAD Sustainable Practices in Design classes have worked with members of Accelerate Savannah to further their endeavor of fostering the growth of Savannah’s green collar economy. Accelerate Savannah’s intent is to help create, retain and grow sustainability-focused jobs in the region. Primary objectives of this effort include creating an inclusive economy that empowers the chronically underemployed, and permanently retaining some of the creative energy that passes through local colleges and universities.

    Read more

  • seed till fork

    No comments yet

    by Kelly Vormelker

    Approximately one year ago, I competed my Masters in Design for Sustainability at SCAD. My final project focused on the relationships between small local farms and restaurants. Since graduating, I have continued to work within the local food scene of Savannah. I have continued my work at local 11ten, a restaurant that sources the majority of its product from local farms, I became a market manager at the Forsyth Farmer’s Market and I represent Savannah River Farms by selling their all natural beef, pork, poultry and lamb to local restaurants. I am excited to be a part of this changing scene and I continually look for ways to work within and improve it.

    Read more

  • A Saga for Savannah

    No comments yet

    By Nicole Andrews, Jerome Elder, Liz Lukken and Santiago Castillo

    When determining how to define SA/GA for the community of Savannah, we drew inspiration from the origin of the word saga. The term saga was used to refer to Scandinavian epics that depicted battles, victories, feats, and journeys. Having knowledge that the word refers to an epic tale of victories, we wanted to encapsulate the spirit of Savannah’s rich cultural history into what defines SA/GA.

    Read more